Learn Traditional Mexican Paper Making

dsc_3909The early history of Mexico, as recorded by both the Aztecs and the Mayans, was on amate paper. The Aztecs used amate (its náhuatl name) to make tributes to their traditional gods of corn, tomatoes, peanuts, chile, coffee, beans, bananas and mango. This native Mexican paper is beautiful and today serves as the canvas for brightly colored yet pricy paintings, is used in clothing, pre-hispanic ulama balls and ropes, and for sculptures.

I’ve experimented with printing photos on amate, as I figure if I’m taking photos of indigenous life, what more natural and appropriate way to present them than on handmade paper made in the prehispanic tradition? My artist colleagues love amate for painting and printmaking. If you do any sort of paper handicraft—card making, lamp shades, pulled paper drawing, journal creation—it works beautifully for that as well. And, perhaps the greatest thing is that making and using amate helps to preserve a centuries-old tradition, connecting us to this land and culture in our adopted home.

Monday and Tuesday, March 11-12 you will have the rare opportunity to learn with one of the very last remaining masters of amate-making in a workshop at the beautiful and historic Galería Baupres, between Casa Haas and Totem in Centro Histórico. The amate workshop will be conducted by Maestro Genaro Fuentes Trejo, an Otomí (hñahñu) elder who teaches paper-making classes at Bellas Artes/The Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City as well as at museums and universities around the country (Tampico, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas, Saltillo, Querétaro). He comes to us from from San Pablito, Pahuatlán, in the state of Puebla. We are incredibly privileged to bring this talented, humble and personable artist to Mazatlán. Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

Making amate is an incredibly labor-intensive process. Fortunately, Maestro Genaro does the heavy lifting for us, leaving us to the fun and creative part. He hikes out into the woods to harvest the trees. He cuts them up, cooks the pieces, and makes them into pulp. During our class we’ll use that pulp—natural fibers of amate, tule, yuca, plátano, etc.—for our creations, and then sun-dry our final products the same way the Aztecs did.

During the workshop you will be able to make multiple pieces of gorgeous paper. Genaro will probably bring mora wood, which makes a gorgeous white paper, and palo colorado, which produces a beautiful dark colored paper. You’ll learn to lay out your fiber in a geometric pattern on wooden planks, and use a lava stone/basalt mano stone to crush the pulp, fusing it together. You can make plain color paper, or weave the differing colored fibers together to produce a design. Adding flower petals to your paper provides a splash of color, as does adding traditional colored paper cutouts. The maestro also will bring several molds of indigenous designs, and we can mold our paper using those. You’ll finish off your paper with the sweet smell of citrus, as we use orange peel to polish our finished product before drying it in the sun, the same way amate has been made for centuries.

We were delighted with our creations in the last class, and are eager to attempt some more complex pieces in this next one. If you wish, you can purchase large pieces of amate from the maestro, as well as purchase additional pulp and the basalt mano to take home to continue your paper making. Basalt, the lava rock, is said to have calming properties and connect us to Mother Earth.

The class requires a minimum of ten paid participants in order to pay for the Maestro’s transportation, so please register early and help us spread the word! Maestro Genaro is fluent in Otomi and Spanish, but does not speak English; Dianne will be present to interpret as needed. The class and the process are a whole lot of fun and it is a craft you can easily do that opens the door to so many creative projects. Thank you for helping us support traditional Mexican indigenous art!

DETAILS
Monday and Tuesday, 11-12 March, 2019
4 – 9 pm each day
Galería Baupres, Heriberto Frías 1506 (between Casa Haas and Totem)
tel. 669-113-0941, open Tuesday-Fridays from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm and 3:00 – 6:00 pm.
Cost: 1300 pesos, cash only please, pay in advance to reserve your spot and 100% refund if the class does not fill (but it’s looking good; if everyone who says they want to come pays, we could all be happy).
Bring 3 pieces of 10 mm thick plywood sized 60 cm x 40 cm, or let us know and we’ll get them for you at our cost.

 

Gratitude for Life in Mazatlán

Research has shown that gratitude—taking the time to reflect on what we are thankful for in our lives—has physical, psychological and social benefits. Feeling grateful provides us stronger immune systems, fewer aches and pains, lower blood pressure and better sleep; more positive emotions, feelings of alertness, joy, pleasure, optimism and happiness. Thankful people are more helpful, generous, compassionate, forgiving and outgoing; they feel less isolated and lonely.

Gratitude is a major aspect of most every world religion. The three Abrahamic faiths all value thankfulness. From the words of King David in the Book of Psalms—“Oh Lord, my God, I will give thanks to you forever” (30:12), to the words of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew—“You shall love your neighbor as yourself” (22:37-40) and the words of Muhammad in the suras, “Gratitude for the abundance you have received is the best insurance that the abundance will continue,” it is clear we should appreciate what we have. Buddhists give thanks for all that life has to offer, the good and the bad, as suffering helps us appreciate our gifts and become more compassionate. Hindus show gratitude through service and hospitality. Confucianism and Taoism look at gratitude as a key pillar of daily life. Here in Mexico we have the small pewter milagros, expressions of thanks for healing delivered or promises kept. Etruscan culture had similar gratitude offerings, but they were commonly made of terracotta.

Many people in the world take classes, participate in therapy, or write in gratitude journals in order to cultivate an attitude of gratitude. Here in Mazatlán, however, it comes naturally to most of us. It’s actually difficult to live among such kind, happy people, in such gorgeous surroundings, and not feel grateful.

It is said that gratitude has two components. First is an affirmation of goodness: life is not perfect, but we are able to identify some amount of goodness in our lives. Living here in Mazatlán, we know that things are not always rosy or “paradise”—as the tourist brochures may say. We live in reality, but most of us are also incredibly grateful for the opportunity to enjoy this incredible place, be it our natal or adopted home.

Second, gratitude involves a humble dependence on others or a higher power—a recognition beyond personal pride, that something beyond oneself helps us achieve the goodness in our lives. In this case, Mazatlán itself, the beauty of our natural setting, the friendliness of her people, causes a sense of thankfulness in nearly everyone who lives here.

Today I was reflecting on our lives here. We’ve been coming here since 1979. We were married here. We raised our son in Mazatlán. We’ve lived here full-time since 2008. I am consistently and eternally grateful, for so very many things. Below is today’s “top 15” list. I’d very much welcome hearing what you are most grateful for in the comments below.

  1. Incredible VIEWS—of the port, the ocean, the city, the mountains—including those overlooking the rise of the Super Wolf Moon or the eclipse of the blood moon. Click on the arrow, or just pause and watch, to view each slideshow.

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  2. 20 miles of gorgeous BEACH on which you can relax, eat and drink, play volleyball or soccer, swim, do yoga or tai chi, fish…

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  3. The world’s most amazing SUNSETS, not to mention SUNRISES!

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  4. CULINARY experiences for every palate, from street carts to beach palapas and fine dining, traditional to fusion. Food offerings are anchored in our fresh-caught SEAFOOD: lobster, oysters, scallops, and fish and supplemented by the harvest of fresh VEGGIES grown right here in the tortilla basket of Mexico. The ORGANIC FARMERS’ MARKET on Saturday mornings brings together local and international community members who value health and sustainability.

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  5. World-class VISUAL AND PERFORMANCE ART—opera, ballet, modern dance, symphony, mariachi, norteño and indigenous arts. Our local art community is both talented and welcoming, more than willing to teach as well as collaborate. Mazatlán is also blessed with an international caliber municipal art school with classes for anyone in the community, and we are, of course, home base to the international music sensation that is banda.

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  6. A long history as a mixed COMMUNITY OF NATIONALS AND INTERNATIONALS, from back in our heyday as a major hub on the trans-Pacific sailing trade route. This gives me the benefit of LOCAL FRIENDS who teach me so much, are patient with my lack of understanding, and who make me very grateful to call this place home; and INTERNATIONAL FRIENDS who bring me love and understanding in ways that are familiar and comfortable, allowing me to go out and explore and experiment with the new and unfamiliar and also find respite and reflection. Expats here are amazingly talented, adventurous people, give back in hugely beneficial ways to the local community, and make life in Mexico so much sweeter!

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  7. Any kind of SPORT you could want to participate in: runners have loads of organized marathons, triathlons and 5 and 10k races; swimmers have an Olympic pool, open-water swim club and ocean-fed public pool; we all enjoy the world’s largest open-air gymnasium, the malecón, where you can bike, roller blade, run or walk; hikers can enjoy the lighthouse, Deer Island, or any of a myriad of rustic trails around the municipality; we have baseball, golf, tennis, surfing….

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  8. Amazing WILDLIFE! We have BIRD WATCHING: in the mangrove jungle, Estero del Camarón, Estero del Yugo, Playa Norte, the botanic garden… pretty much anywhere in town. Look to the ocean and you can see whales, dolphins and rays jumping. Just outside of town you can enjoy watching and photographing macaws, jaguars, deer or coati, among many other animals.

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  9. HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS that people travel across the world to attend, including our family-oriented and inclusive CARNAVAL, supposedly third-biggest in the world, and our DAY OF THE DEAD celebration combining the best of Mexican tradition and innovative artistry. Many mazatlecos are globally minded and talented, so we also are able to enjoy HOLIFEST, ANIME festivals and other innovative events.

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  10. Excellent diversity of EDUCATION at affordable prices, which attracts national as well as international families to life in our port, and an ECONOMICALLY DIVERSE city, with tourism, the port, fishing, farming, a brewery, coffee…
  11. Loving and inclusive SPIRITUAL COMMUNITIES with services in multiple languages, where we can grow, reach out to help others and feel loved.
  12. ARCHITECTURE lovers will find a mix of unique historic buildings downtown in tropical neoclassical style and award-winning modern structures such as the Carpa Olivera remodel or the Montessori school.

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  13. FIREWORKS nearly every night of the week somewhere in town, and loads of free public entertainment in the various plazas.

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  14. Nearby SMALL TOWNS to escape city life. These include BEACH TOWNS like Barras de Piaxtla, Stone Island, Caimanero, Escuinapa or Teacapán, where we enjoy dozens of miles of pristine beach. Also wonderful are MOUNTAIN TOWNS such as La Noria, El Quelite, Copala, Concordia, where we can take a day trip to learn about mining, see completely different flora and fauna, or eat fresh cheese and meat. These small towns offer a completely different way of life from Mazatlán as well as local arts and craftsmanship, and the opportunity to take killer night photos of the Milky Way.

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  15. The FRIENDLIEST PEOPLE you’ll meet anywhere on the planet. I’ve traveled and lived in most of it; I have a bit of experience on which to place my judgment. Here you’ll find the riches of the rich and the poorest of the poor, and most everyone you meet will be eager to offer a smile, a salutation and an offer of assistance.

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    Please remember to let me know in the comments below what makes YOU grateful to live in or visit Mazatlán! All photos are my own, ThruDisEyes.com.

The Gringo Guide to Mexico

VOL 1 copy.R2.jpgBook Review: The Gringo Guide to Mexico, vol. II, by Murry E. Page
US$9.95 ebook, $17.95 paperback on Amazon as of  November 1, 2018
Link to volume 1

Many expats in Mazatlán are fans of Murry Page. I for one love his writing and used to regularly look forward to his blog posts. Murry would thoroughly research and write about a broad range of cultural and historical topics, from chile to Diego Rivera’s murals, tequila to organ grinders, and bullfighting to Carlos Slim. As he traveled through, lived in and learned more about Mexico, we were able to educate ourselves thanks to Murry and his noviaand collaborator, Linda Hull. I am eternally grateful to Murry and Linda because years ago they came to our house to interview and help our son when he was in the midst of a fundraising campaign to get himself to World Scout Jamboree in Sweden.

In November 2018 Murry plans to self publish two books, titled The Gringo Guide to Mexico: Its History, People and Culture. In them he assembles 56 editions of his Mazatlán Messenger column, The Page Turner, which he originally wrote over a five-year period. Murry has updated information where necessary to keep content current. He kindly shared with me a copy of volume 2 for review; it contains 160 pages and 28 chapters.

“… all of my writings have the purpose of providing foreign nationals living in México and those who hope to call México their home in the future, information that will make their life here more interesting and meaningful. It is hoped that those who read The Gringo Guide to México …will have a better understanding of the history, people, and culture of their new home.”
—page 4

If you were not able to read Murry’s work the first time around, and you are at all curious about this adopted country we call home, I highly recommend you get these books. And, if you did enjoy his columns the first time around, you may delight to read them all over again, remembering what you’d once read and since forgotten. While I learn something new every day, I am constantly saddened at the ignorance so many of us immigrants and seasonal visitors have about our host country. Are you aware of how Cinco de Mayo helped save the US from slavery? Why Pancho Villa is revered by some and hated by others, was first wanted by and later helped by the US government? And do you know the history of legal Mexican field labor up north, starting with the braceros?

It’s refreshing to read an engaging volume written by someone intelligent (retired lawyer), personable, and committed to the community—Murry dedicated 100% of the profits from his first book to Hospice Mazatlán and has served on the board of two local charitable organizations—on topics that pique our curiosity and are worthwhile knowing about in our daily lives. I love history, but I whither up in boredom reading a dry history book. These volumes are far from that—quick-reading and amusing, with personal reflections and anecdotes thrown in for good measure. I will admit to enjoying the columns more when they were spread out one every couple of weeks than in book form. As blog posts the facts and information were nice tapas, a fairly in-depth look at a topic that we could slowly savor. I would, therefore, recommend reading the book a chapter at a time, to more thoroughly relish the content. Discussing it with a partner or friends will let the facts settle in and stir further curiosity for learning.

Thank you, Murry, for being so generous with your passion for learning about Mexico, your time and your wonderful writing. Both books will be available in ebook (US$9.99 per volume) and paperback (US$17.95 per volume) on Amazon from November 1, 2018.

A Challenging Race is Coming to Mazatlán

Something Different for the Running Community

Extreme price and info

[UPDATED WITH IMPORTANT DATE CHANGE] As most of you know, I like to run – a lot. I enter most carreras here in Mazatlán with a personal limit of half-marathon (21 km or 13.1 miles). Most of the races close the Avenida Del Mar for a brief period and runners run on the pavement instead of the malecón, where most train. But, it’s still the same view, it’s still relatively flat and many consider it to be unchallenging. With a few minor exceptions, to join a race with hills and trails, you must leave the area of the malecón and often drive or bus a great distance. Next month, however, brings a unique opportunity starting right along the malecón.

If you’re still reading, I will assume you are interested in participating in something different – something beyond flat. A respected runner in Mazatlán, Prof. Sergio Javier Leyva Santos, has put together XtreMazatlán, to be held on Sunday, November 18th (Please ignore the dates on the graphics). This 12 km (about 7 ½ mile) run will have runners going over two hills (Ice Box Hill and Lookout Hill) as well as up and down the Faro. Some will find this too difficult to imagine, and for that there are options to sign up as a pair or as a relay team of five people. He has assembled many great sponsors including dportenis, Powerade, La Mazatleca restaurant, TVP, Eléctrica Valdéz and Turbulence Training. I was fortunate to attend the press conference last week and can tell you that enthusiasm for this race was over the top! Many of us run the Faro on a regular basis and have longed for a race that would include it. Our wishes have been answered. Oh, and the city has agreed to close the Faro to all other traffic during the race.

Extreme group foto

The race begins at the new Sister City Park where Zaragoza hits Paseo Clausen. From there, it is right down to business with a run up Ice Box Hill, down the stairs into Olas Altas, up Lookout Hill, down Paseo del Centenario, and up to the lighthouse. If you sign up as a running pair, you will end your half here and your partner will take over. Once down the lighthouse, it’s up the 175 stairs to the Restaurant La Marea (formerly El Mirador), around and up the backside of Lookout Hill, up Bateria and then back down to Olas Altas, up the stairs to Ice Box Hill and around and down to return to Sister City Park. There will be five water stations, most of which runners will pass twice. The relay points for the teams of five are shown on the map below.

Extreme 12k map

There will also be a 5K (3.1 miles) for runners, walkers and families in the general area of the park and Zaragoza. The 12 km begins at 6:30 am, the 5 km at 7:00 and kids’ runs beginning at 9:00. You can sign up at dportenis locations in the Gran Plaza, Plaza Sendero and in El Centro on Azueta. Cost is 300 pesos per person for the 12 km and 100 pesos for the 5 km. The first 100 people to sign up for the 12 km will receive a dry-fit shirt and a commemorative medal. The first 200 people to sign up for the 5 km will receive a commemorative medal.

Extreme 5k map only

The running community in Mazatlan is very welcoming, supportive and inclusive. Don’t be shy about signing up, and feel free to ask me if you have any questions. In the meantime, click any picture below to click through a slideshow and see all the pertinent details:

While I’m at it, there are a few other upcoming races you may want to know about:

Sunday October 21: Trail run in Cosalá. Choice of 10 km, 15 km or 30 km. Very challenging. Incredible views and lots of hills. This will require a hotel stay the night before. Be prepared to get wet, perhaps very wet, on the longer distances depending on creek levels. The photo below has all the details.

Cosala Trail Run

The same day as the Cosalá trail run there is a Píntate 5K sponsored by MazAtún. If you are not familiar with a píntate, as you walk or run, you will have exuberant youth throwing non-toxic, somewhat clothing friendly, colored powder on you. If you choose to pass through it, there is usually a spray station which will mist you up to enable the colors to stick better. Lots of fun. Price is 150 pesos, no time given, but it will be in the morning. With the malecón construction, I’m not sure of the route.

The most well-known annual event is the Gran Maratón Pacífico, this year celebrating 20 years of bigger and better races. The event is Saturday and Sunday, December 1&2. Saturday features a 5km and a 10km with Sunday featuring a half and a full marathon. Saturday night, traditionally, is the Festival of Lights with fireworks around the bay. Last year, this was postponed due to road and malecon construction. If you don’t participate by running, spend some time cheering on the runners and admiring their dedication. The Kenyans come to town along with a host of International and National runners so the competition is truly world-class.

maraton logo

 

A general tip if you are looking to find competitive running in Mazatlan is to look on Facebook (including joining the group: Mazatlan Running Group), listen to local radio and check the newspaper periodically.

I’ve started training for the hills? How about you?

The Spelling Bee Contest

img_7288So, Greg and I are swimming in work right now, but one of our “sons” from Scouts asked us to spend the morning at Colegio Valladolid judging a spelling bee.

Judge a spelling bee? Words are either spelled correctly or they’re not, no? What’s to judge? You give kids words, when they mis-spell they sit down, and you continue until one person remains standing. Right? We figured we’d show up, spend an hour or maybe an hour and a half, have some fun, and come home.

Well, just like book clubs here in Mazatlán are different than those I grew up with up north, evidently spelling bees are different, too. Here we were judging a school spelling bee “contest,” with three top winners to be selected for each grade level, pre-K through ninth grade. They had already held spelling bees in each classroom, so the top three students from every class participated in this school-wide contest. Words were printed on paper and put into a container, and each student fished out three small pieces of paper. Those papers were given to the judges, and we read each student three words.

Judging was HARD. Sometimes lots of kids spelled all three words correctly; sometimes almost no one spelled the words correctly; so how were we to choose? We were told that the students should repeat the word at the beginning, before they started spelling, and again at the end, once they finished spelling. They should spell the word correctly, pronounce it correctly, and have confidence. So, at least we had a few additional criteria.

The other problem for me was the kids are CUTE!!!! Way cute! How distracting is that, lol? We had five year olds through junior high school kids. Some were nervous, some were excited, some spelled fast, others spelled slow, some sounded out the words, some seemed to just throw letters out into space. Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

The whole gym was decorated for the spelling bee. Colorful drawings of bees were everywhere: on the walls, topping the pens, on the word container, on the stages. Teachers wore yellow polos with black pants, and most students wore yellow and black, also. Teachers also put “feelers” on their heads; it was all quite amusing. Lucky kids.

I was astounded at how good the five year olds were spelling words in a foreign language. I was also blown away at the older kids, who ably spelled difficult words that many native speaking adults spell incorrectly. I wondered at why there were so many girls in the contest at the younger grade levels, and proportionately more boys at the older grade levels. What changes and when? I felt bad for the kids who’d say “e” for “i,” because that’s how it’s pronounced in Spanish. And I really felt bad for the little girl who cried because she didn’t win first place; broke my heart!

Obviously the event went on a bit long with so many kids and 10 grade levels! We spent the entire morning at the school. And it was a lot of fun. We felt like “international celebrity judges.” The kids wanted to take pictures with us and their teachers. We were served a nice breakfast. We had several parents commend us for being fair and impartial. We enjoyed watching our “son” shine; I had no idea his English was so good! And we did him and his colleagues a favor; they were obviously happy not to have to judge the spelling bee themselves—it seems parents can be competitive!