Pride

Daniel Marín and Ale Elenes

Most every one of us has felt marginalized, left out, misunderstood, bullied or abused in one way or another in our lives. For those who find themselves outside traditional binary gender categories or whose sexual attraction isn’t hetero, life can come with way too many challenges at way too young an age. I believe this is why Pride celebrations are so incredibly important; they give us permission to celebrate love, acceptance, visibility and justice.

As a Mazatlán resident, I am delighted that we have a vibrant, vocal and talented LGBTQQIAAP (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexuual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersexual, Allies, Asexual, Pansexual) community. This past Saturday, though our city is again under “red light” for the pandemic, both a Pride parade and a major Pride event in the Angela Peralta Theater took place. Many complained it was dangerous and bad timing to gather. While I agree, it surely was a better reason congregating than was the banda concert on Friday night at the new football stadium.

Performances included classical ballet, modern dance, comedy, impersonation and drag. The juxtaposition of complex emotions that often accompany these events was there. 

  • Attendees’ hearts soared; love and joy ruled. 
  • It felt great to shower attention on people and issues that are so often kept in the shadows. 
  • Though I no longer frequent night clubs, I am proud to know that our town has such high caliber performers and that I know I can go enjoy them anytime. 
  • It is discomfiting to see a man looking much more voluptuous and sexier as a woman than I’ve ever looked in my life. 
  • Knowing how it feels to struggle with an ill-fitting bra, high-heeled shoes or other item of clothing, I feel tons of empathy for those in drag struggling to keep their rubber hips and padded breasts in place while moving around on stage. 
  • I am saddened that people whose gender is not what their birth bodies indicate have to struggle so. Life is so not fair.
  • I realize how many LGBTQ+ individuals do not enjoy these sorts of events, for various reasons; it shows the diversity within any community of people.
  • There were so many communities of support in the theater on Saturday night! Performers’ families and friends showed up to hoot, holler and generally encourage them, multi-generational families in the audience all gleefully enjoyed the show, and the children in the audience learned to embrace difference rather than fear it.
  • So many attendees dressed up, cross-dressed, or wore Pride gear. They carried signs and flags. There was shared purpose.
  • It was incredible to see love expressed in so many different ways and combinations.

In the theater everyone wore masks and seats were socially distanced. However, it was very crowded. As a member of the press, it was hard to get close enough to get good photos. That’s where I admire the newspaper photographers; they do this all the time and know exactly what gear to bring and what settings to use. In this post I’ve included a few of my favorites from Saturday night. I trust you’ll enjoy them.

Click any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

The Angela Peralta was decked out for the event. The façades of the Municipal School of the Arts and the opera house were lit with rainbow-colored lights. The lobby of the theater had a huge rainbow carpet, rainbow wall, tall statues lit in rainbow colors, and an altar in tribute to a departed friend. The stage lighting transported the theater to Broadway; everyone present knew we were part of something big. 

They say one in every ten people is LGBTQ+. My guess is it’s higher than that. In celebration of justice, love and inclusion, how about each of us reach out to a friend or neighbor and have a real conversation? Ask if they wouldn’t mind sharing with us a bit of their life journey, their joys and challenges. Find out what we all have in common, and what we don’t. And how we can all live in this world in ways that bring out the best of each and every one of us, while minimizing the struggle. Amidst all the social distancing and isolation, such conversations can surely do a world of good.

Get Your Pajaritos Now!

One of the most enjoyable local fishing traditions in Mazatlán is when the pajaritos run. In English these delicious fish, normally fried up whole here, are called ballyhoos, flying halfbeaks or spipefish, closely related to needlefish. They are called “flying fish” in our local parlance because they glide over the surface of the water at up to 60 kph/37 mph.

The fishing boats glowing on the bay and reflecting on the beach as they catch pajaritos

Last night the boats were all fortunately very close in fishing, and you could easily watch them come in to unload and sell. The energy was palpable and festive; the fishermen make good money for just a few hours’ work. It was a fun family scene, far tamer than in non-pandemic times but still a lot of excitement. You can maintain your social distance and get down to the boats to buy your fish. Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

In May of 2019 I took my tripod and good camera down to Playa Norte to capture the joy and excitement of this event. You can see those photos and read an in-depth story here. This year of course we have a pandemic, and I was not comfortable to take more than a quick masked walk through the area and photos with my cell phone.

Pajarito season can last just a few days or, if we’re lucky, a few weeks. So, head down to your nearest fishing boat mooring and get yours! You can find them on Stone Island, at the embarcadero to Stone Island, and in Playa Norte. It’s best to take your own container—a big bucket or smaller bowl or Tupperware will do. They were again selling for 40 pesos per kg and cleaned ones for 100 pesos per kg. If you don’t want to cook your own, local seafood places have them on the menu now. They are delicious! If you haven’t tried this local tradition, don’t miss it. If you have, I’m sure you’re happy to know the pajaritos are back.

New Year’s Eve 2020

The year that COVID-19 took the world by storm is behind us. Vaccines are rolling out to medical professionals around the world, and in some countries like Israel to the general population. We have a glimmer of hope that we will once again be able to demonstrate physical affection to our friends and non-resident family members, while I know I hope and pray that we have all learned a bit about stewardship of our environment and of our own mental and emotional balance.

This New Year’s Eve in Mazatlán this year was oh-so-very-different from the normal, and yet in many ways was so much the same. There were no municipal celebrations nor official fireworks or drones, at least that I know of. Among the foreign resident community, most everyone I know stayed home and at most gathered in small groups, as did most of my local friends.

Younger people, however, have been partying all week if not all month. Busloads of tourists filled the port, and many of the hotels offered New Year’s buffets with music and fireworks. While the malecón was quieter overnight than a usual New Year’s Eve, when we awoke to take a walk this morning we found a lady urinating on the sidewalk behind our house and loads of litter and trash floating on the maleconcito and in the lagoon.

Greg and I enjoyed New Year’s Eve with our son and his girlfriend via online video. Just before midnight we took our champagne and my camera and tripod out to take a few photos of the Golden Zone fireworks from the beach in front of our house. What was nice is that we were all alone on our beach, yet were able to enjoy a spectacularly clear night. I include a few photos and hope you’ll enjoy them. They are fireworks displays from the hotels, by and large. Families around town, of course, also let them off during the evening and overnight. Click on any photo to enlarge it or to view a slideshow.

I wish all our readers and friends a 2021 filled with health, joy and renewed connections. May we love and care for ourselves, each other and our planet with enhanced conviction.

Merry Christmas/House for Juan Manuel

May the joy and hope of this holiday season fill each of you and help keep you healthy and happy throughout the year!

Today on Christmas Eve Day we went out to Colonia San Antonio. Having handed out chickens and food every Christmas Eve for nearly 25 years, it just didn’t feel like the holidays without it. We gave out some toys to the kids, some clothing and household items to the adults, and chatted with some of the friends we’ve made there over the years, including Don José and Maestra Zulema. We got to know Juan Manuel’s new neighbor, Lucero, who has kindly agreed to store our supplies in her fenced yard that’s guarded by watch dogs during our construction process. 

This week we made great progress: the concrete floor was poured, and the workers began to build the cinder block walls. It is wonderful to be able to walk inside the house and feel the size of the rooms and picture how it will be! Very exciting stuff thanks to all of you!!!

After reviewing this week’s progress and paying Zata and his helper, we went over to wish Don Rodolfo and Juan Manuel a Merry Christmas. The horrible news this week was that Don Rodolfo had a mild stroke. He is a bit paralyzed on the left side of his mouth and in his left arm/hand and leg. He was lucky, for sure. He went to a neurologist for assessment and has medicines, and we are hoping to get him to a cardiologist right after Christmas. Below is their beautiful greeting of well wishes and appreciation to each of you:

Fifth House Update

This week we are commencing our second week of construction. Thus far Zata has been doing an excellent job. He sends us photos of his work on a daily basis, as well as photos of all deliveries and invoices. That system has been working great and hopefully will continue that way. The foundation and underground portion of the plumbing are in, as you can see from the photos—note the pipes for both the kitchen and the bathroom. Next will be installing the platforms for the walls and putting in the floor.

Jorge and Greg went to the job site on Friday to review the work and pay Zata. The architect went by today (Monday) to check on the quality and accuracy of the work. Late last week we opened an account at a construction supply store that makes deliveries to the job site every day in order to prevent theft. However, we are having to get resourceful as some days the supply shop doesn’t have what we need, so we have to go looking elsewhere. But, so far so good. Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

To date we have received donations from 41 wonderfully generous people for a total of almost 72,000 pesos. In addition this week we received an in-kind donation of a toilet and bathroom sink, as well as a few smaller items such as a toilet paper holder, towel bars and shelves. Bless you all! Juan Manuel and Don Rodolfo will be over the moon to own such high quality ceramic items!

The lot on which we are building the house is very small. However, it is in an excellent location within the invasion, with green space and a nice view. The neighbors also seem kind. Here is a short video of the location:

Zata is telling us that he is hoping to have construction of the house completed in six weeks, which means four more to go. Fingers crossed! Thank you all for your holiday generosity! Your caring is making a huge difference in the lives of these two gentlemen. Please get the word out to your friends and neighbors; together we can do this. Here is the link to the initial article with information on how to donate.