Covid-19 Update Mazatlán

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Despite—or perhaps because of—our concern about Semana Santa and COVID-19, things are finally getting quiet here in Mazatlán: no RAZRs running up and down the malecón at all hours, almost no motorcycles revving, and very few pulmonías or aurigas blaring their music in the middle of the night. It has taken a while, but Mexico is on board.

This pandemic to me is Mother Nature’s way of sending us all to our rooms and telling us to reflect on our actions while she cleans up her air. I do hope we will listen, but looking at the number of single-use masks now polluting our global waterways (photos below from the internet–not from Mazatlán), it seems we are not learning.

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Governor Quirino Ordaz first closed schools and massive events; then casinos, discos and cinemas. Next bars and restaurants were ordered to scale back seating 50%. Despite all this, we went a couple of weeks with loads of fireworks going off around town periodically and banda music blaring—showing that, despite the cancellation of loads of parties and events, others continued. Even now El Muchacho Alegre seems to have a party crowd in the evenings.

As it is up north, here it’s difficult to find hand gel, good sanitizer (bleach seems readily available), and face masks. We worry if medical staff will have the equipment they will need. A week or ten days ago people in Mazatlán started to make fabric masks. First they passed them out to family and friends, and now many locals are selling them, including ones made by the domestic-violence-surviving young women at Floreser. If you need homemade masks, they are my go-to source. Call Ely Cucurumbe at 669-123-1669 and she’ll deliver some to you (50 pesos each); she speaks great English.

Many restaurants have now voluntarily closed or have cut back to pickup or delivery only, including the Panama chain. This week the governor closed all beaches in Sinaloa: ocean, river, lake, stream. We have watched all day today as the lifeguards on 4-wheelers chase down anyone walking or gathering on the beach and make them leave. Banks, doctor’s offices and many stores are practicing the social distancing promoted by cartoon super-heroine “Susana Distancia” (“sana distancia” is “social distancing”) by marking their floors and setting chairs at a safe distance. This sadly does not prevent people from crowding around on top of each other. Below is a photo of the sign on the Cuban place, Carlos and Lucía’s, in the Golden Zone.

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All but essential workers have been asked to shelter in place, as we accustom to a new normal of food and grocery deliveries (stores remain open). Of course workers who are accustomed to living paycheck to paycheck are suffering horribly. President Lopez Obrador has promised relief, and Mazatlán’s mayor has done so, as well. It’s not enough, but it’s something. Most foreigners here have paid their housekeepers to stay home and not work, and I believe most foreign-owned businesses are doing the best they can by their workers, too. These are challenging times, to say the least. Yet, there are those who continue kissing, hugging and drinking on the malecón, and others who insist on partying. It breaks my heart, as so many of us are already indoors for three weeks in order to help minimize the effect of this virus on the community.

Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

Wednesday the governor ordered the closure of all hotels. The AquaMarina Hotel had been one of the first to close, it seems a couple of weeks ago already. The photos above are of workers putting up a fence to prevent access to the Olas Altas Inn on the malecón, plus photos of the Hotel Playa Mazatlán, closed for the first time since its founding, the Decima and the Playa Bonita.

Several of the hotels have lit hearts using the lights of their empty rooms, as a sign of hope to our fair city, I suppose. I do love the gesture. The Hotel Hacienda, of course, has a tradition of lighting up for the holidays. Sadly, this time it’s not a celebration.

Below I throw in a pic of tonight’s sunset for those of you who are up north.

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Be well, dear readers, whether you are here in Mazatlán or you have returned to your families up north. Stay home, stay safe. Help out anyone you know who is alone, has special needs or underlying medical conditions. I hope you can use the time to read, learn a new skill or try a new exercise. Take care of yourselves and reach out to others; creativity is key as we tread this new territory.

Christmas in Parque Central

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The mayor and DIF Mazatlán have a terrific new offering for all of us this Christmas season: an interactive light show set to music on Avenida de la Bahía (formally Avenida Mazatlán), facing Central Park one block off the malecón behind the Olas Altas Inn. Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

The show debuted tonight as city residents and tourists were treated to The Nutcracker ballet performed for free in the open air. Hundreds of people were in attendance, including loads of families with small children ready to start the holiday season off with a bit of joy and merriment. Vendors sold salchichas and balloons to make sure they would benefit from the crowd and earn some money to buy their family’s presents.

The ballet was to have been preceded by the “spectacle of lights,” which was the reason most of the people were there—despite our terrific orchestra, dancers and chorus. All week the lighting guy has been setting up the electric Christmas trees and rehearsing to make sure tonight’s light show complete with fireworks, planned for 6:00 pm, would function well. It would have been terrific, too, as the full moon rose directly over the lighted tree display.

Apparently something malfunctioned even after all that preparation, and the audience wasn’t able to enjoy the show until the intermission of the ballet. By that time scores of families had left: disappointed, grumbling and sad.

The Christmas tree light show is enjoyable and worth a visit, especially if you have family or friends in town, have not yet walked the new mini-malecón—which we love, or  you are looking to get into the Christmas spirit. Greg’s terrific cell phone video of the show is below.

Four shows will be held every evening from now through the New Year at 6:00, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00 pm. Each show lasts about 20 minutes. The fireworks were only for tonight’s event, as far as I know.

Happy Holidays!

The Sand Man Daniel Fermín

DSC_5685-HDR©Remember when Mazatlán had frequent sand sculpture contests? I do; I absolutely LOVED them!

Enter a young man from Zihuatanejo, Daniel Fermín, who currently studies visual arts in Morelia. He is in Mazatlán from now through Christmas, and is making his living via the tips we give him in exchange for enjoying his sand art.

Daniel was making a different sand sculpture every day, starting at 6 am and ending at sunset. On Wednesday he made a giant catrina; on Thursday a sand castle. He tells me he may keep the castle up for a while, even though castles are not his favorites. But he says he makes better tips with castles because the public seems to prefer them to other designs. Personally, the photo he had of an octopus he sculpted was my favorite. I asked him if he’d do that here, and he wouldn’t commit. Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow.

He asks that if you go to admire his work and take photos that you please leave him a little something to help keep him fed. I think that the major hotels in town should commission Daniel to personalize a sculpture for them and their guests, and do photo ops! Don’t you think, local empresarios??? The guy who rents umbrellas is helping him out, and a local family is graciously putting him up.

Daniel can be found on the beach below the Fisherman’s Monument. Be sure to check out him and his creations from time to time through the rest of the year.

Below are a few more pics that I couldn’t resist taking during our visit. I hope you enjoy them.

International Ballet Gala!

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You do NOT want to miss this incredible benefit performance by the principal dancers of the best ballet companies in Mexico! Dancers will join us from the Ballet de Monterrey, the Compañía Nacional de Danza de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, the Escuela Superior de Música y Danza in Monterrey as well as from the renowned Fomento Artístico Cordobés. The gala will benefit DIF Mazatlán — families in need in our municipality and take place on Sunday, November 17 at 6:00 pm in the Angela Peralta Theater; the promotional video is below.

Now, let me tell you the story behind this terrific event; Mazatlán is so incredibly lucky. Carolina Rios, originally from Culiacán, has a ballet school here in the marina (Carolina Rios Ballet). A talented and experienced dancer in her own right, it turns out she is married to Cuahutémoc Nájera Ruiz, the National Dance Coordinator and former principal dancer of the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes! The couple frequently travels to Sinaloa, of course; they fell in love with Mazatlán and decided to raise their daughter here. Sounds a lot like our family!

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Caro Rios

So, Carolina moved here three years ago to prepare the way for the family, but Cuahutémoc keeps getting promoted, and, well, hasn’t been able to fully make the move yet (he will be here on Monday for a press conference about the gala).

Despite her busy schedule with their five-year-old and her dance academy, Caro is very passionate about promoting cultural events in Sinaloa. So, she’s called on her friends, including Marta Sahagún Morales from Fomento Artístico Cordobés, and Diana Farias Ortegón, Director of the Escuela Superior de Música y Danza de Monterrey, both of whom said they’d love to bring their dancers to Mazatlán and support any cultural effort here that Carolina has planned. God bless good friends! She invites you to the event in the video below.

Dancers from other companies were also happy to join in. The gala will include four dancers from Bellas Artes (Ana Elisa Mena, Roberto Rodríguez, Valeria Mariaud and Argenis Montalvo) and two Cuban dancers from Ballet de Monterrey (Daniela Favelo and Jonhal Fernández). The performance will include international classics as well as some contemporary choreography.

The gala will include a musical interlude with an aria sung by Mazatlecan mezzosoprano Daniela Rico Coppel, and piano played by Lorenzo Sendra Galván Duque, an autistic child prodigy from Guadalajara. Click on any photo to enlarge it or view a slideshow. The complete and incredibly impressive program for the event is:

Introduction
Choreography by Carolina Rios • Music by Ludwig van Beethoven • Interpreted by Ana Elisa Mena and students of Carolina Rios Ballet

Bohemian Rhapsody
Choreography by Josué Rebollo • Music by Queen • Interpreted by Jorge Emilio Peña, Engel Pérez , Aron de Jesús, Jesús Martín Rivera, Braulio Fernández, Alec Reyes, Roberto Cobos, Armando Villa and David Pérez, students of Fomento Artístico Cordobés • Directed by Martha Sahagún

Don Quijote “Pas de deux from Act IV with Kitri and Basilio”
Choreography by Marius Petipa • Music by Ludwig Minkus • Interpreted by Valeria Mariaud and Argenis Montalvo

Planimetría del Movimiento
Choreography by Irina Marcano • Interpreted by Ana Elisa Mena and Roberto Rodríguez

La Esmeralda “Pas de deux of Diane and Actéon”
Choreography by Agripina Vaganova • Music by Riccardo Drigo and Cesare Pugni • Interpreted by Daniela Favelo and Jonhal Fernández

Musical Interlude
Daniela Rico Coppel / Mezzosprano • Lorenzo Sendra Galván Duque / Piano

Intermission (10 Minutos)

Swan Lake “Pas de deux of the White Swan”
Choreography by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov • Music by Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky • Interpreted by Valeria Mariaud and Argenis Montalvo

Giselle “Adagio from Act II”
Choreography by Jean Coralli y Jules Perrot • Music by Adolphe Adam • Interpreted by Ana Elisa Mena and Roberto Rodríguez

La Bayadére “The Kingdom of the Shades”
Daniela Favelo and Jonhal Fernández • Music by Ludwig Minkus • Students of the Escuela Superior de Música y Danza de Monterrey

Get your tickets now at the Angela Peralta box office or by sending Caro a WhatsApp (+52-1-669-941-2550) and paying via PayPal. This looks to be the most exciting event to take place in Mazatlán in quite some time. Help me get the word out and let’s fill the Angela Peralta to capacity!

Mamut!

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The archeological museum in Mazatlan (located on Sixto Osuno, across from the Art Museum) has a very large visitor on display until August 25. I encourage all of you to take some time to go check out: Mamut: The Prehistoric Giant.

What is Mamut? Mamut is mammoth in English. So, yes, there is a huge frigging mammoth skeleton sitting inside our little, often unnoticed and sorely under-appreciated, museum. This particular mammoth is on loan from Mexico City. If any science nerds are wondering, it is a Columbian mammoth. It was brought here in crates from Mexico City and took a team of five archeologists 12 complete days to reassemble. It is a sight to behold.

The museum is open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., seven days a week. The cost is only 45 pesitos and you get to see much more than a mammoth. The museum is chock full of pieces of history from Sinaloa and beyond with many placards in English if your sciencey Spanish is a little rusty. Pro Tip: get in free any day with your INAPAM card, and Permanent Residents get in free on Sundays. Gilbran, Director of INAH for Sinaloa, is generally there and speaks great English.

As recently as 10,000-15,000 years ago, mammoths roamed Sinaloa and other parts of Mexico. If you think banda is loud, can you imagine the sound and feeling of a pack of fifty 4-ton beasts coming towards you? This mammoth was not discovered locally, but rather in Ecatepec in 1995. The bones displayed are 80% original to this animal with missing parts replaced with bones from other mammoths or modeled. This is the reason one leg appears shorter than the others, as it was missing and another mammoth had to supply the replacement.

Cause of death is not known, but it’s pretty certain that some of our early ancestors ate well off the missing leg—whether hunted or scavenged. This mammoth died early at around age 25. Mammoths are known to have lived easily to be 80 years old. I could bore you with facts and figures, but suffice it to say, it’s big, it was heavy, and it’s here. Go check it out!

Oh, and here are some pictures (thanks Dianne):

Just click any photo to see it larger.