Sharp Hospital Receives Prestigious National Certification (and some exciting Carnaval news)

Chairman Kuroda receiving a plaque from State Secretary of Tourism Cordova,<br />State Secretary of Health Echeverría, and Mazatlán Mayor Felton.

Chairman Kuroda receiving a plaque from State Secretary of Tourism Cordova,
State Secretary of Health Echeverría, and Mazatlán Mayor Felton.

Mexico’s General Health Council has given Mazatlán’s own Hospital Sharp an impressive 9.5 out of 10 points on a prestigious patient care accreditation, making it one of only two hospitals in Sinaloa to achieve such a ranking. The award comes after several years of painstaking work by administration and staff—from janitors, cooks and bookkeepers to doctors, nurses and technicians. Greg and I were pleased to be join the banquet on top of SECTUR’s offices on the malecón last Wednesday night, to honor those involved in this effort to better position Mazatlán in national and international medical tourism markets. It was a joy to be in the presence of so many different types of medical professionals enjoying one another’s company and accomplishments.

In attendance were Mazatlán’s Mayor Carlos Felton and the first lady, Sinaloa State Tourism Secretary Francisco Córdova and his wife, and Sinaloa State Secretary of Health Ernesto Echeverría. During the banquet 35 division heads and key staff received commemorative plaques. Ing. Juan Manuel Kuroda, who is Chairman of the Hospital’s Board of Directors and the primary investor in Hospital Sharp (yes, also owner of Kuroda tile), says, “We are very proud of our 219 dedicated employees who were instrumental in achieving this result.  In addition to serving the needs of our local population and foreign visitors, with this certification we are also able to compete on a level playing field in the Medical Tourism market worldwide.”

The accreditation centers on patient care. Each aspect of the quality of medical attention and patient safety, from evidence gathering to diagnosis and treatment as well as accurate record keeping with precise checks and balances was evaluated against international standards.

Hospital Sharp has a modern physical facility with open spaces and 41 single-bed rooms, along with constant fresh air intake to lessen the transfer of germs and illness. It is a full service, 24-7 surgical facility, has the only dialysis facility in Mazatlán, and is completely self-sufficient—equipped with powerful generators in the event of a disruption in electrical service. Construction began in 1994, and the facility was built to USA standards. Hospital Sharp Mazatlán is located at Av. Rafael Buelna y Dr. Jesús Kumate S/N Fracc, Hacienda Las Cruces C.P. 82126, Mazatlán Sinaloa, telephone (669) 986 56 78.

Mayor Felton’s speech from the event:

Judy Setrakov, who works at Sharp as a medical tourism consultant, received a special tourist ambassador award. She, Doctor Juan Fernando Barraza, and Christian Barrios form Sharp’s Medical Tourism group. They can be reached at the number above, extension 336.

On a completely different note, I also found out on Wednesday evening some extremely exciting news. Carnavál Internacional de Mazatlán will have a Japanese-themed float and dance group this year, to commemorate 400 years of Japan-Mexico diplomatic relations. The float will be a samurai ship. I have been invited to the dance troupe. Special choreography, including a “tequila o-dori,” will be performed, taught to us by a Japanese dance professional from Mexico City. That changes up our annual parade party, but it sure should be fun!

My Return to Toddlerhood

3 panelear

I think the above is pretty self-explanatory about my morning.

  1. I was teaching a class online, and the earpiece of my phone kept falling out. I was focused, so I kept pushing it back in, each time a little more assertively. When the class was over, I looked at my earpiece. It was broken! When did it break? THAT’s why it kept falling out of my ear! After playing with it a bit, I realized the rubber cap that covers the hard plastic earbud was missing. Where had it gone?
  2. After looking around my desk and on the floor, I realized that it was in my ear. I could feel something, very faintly, in there. It didn’t hurt, but I could feel it. I asked Greg to take a look. He didn’t see anything. Had to get a small flashlight. When he was finally able to see it, he said it was jammed pretty far into my ear canal. Oops! Klutz strikes again! I definitely felt like a toddler who’d shoved something up her nose, though in this case it was my ear.
  3. Greg lovingly got out the tweezers and agreed to try to pull it out. Each time he’d get hold of it, the little rubber thingamajig would push against my ear drum or something inside there, and it hurt like the dickens. It began to feel like I had an ELEPHANT stuck in my ear! After a few more tries at getting the rubber piece out, I was near tears it hurt so bad. What to do?

Our doctor wasn’t in yet; this happened prior to his office hours. A trip to the emergency room would be costly, and rather silly. I felt like a three year old, with a toy stuck in my ear. It was embarrassing. And I kept giggling; this all felt so silly.

What about Dr. Simi, the doctor in the pharmacy? Yes! We took a drive down the street and, through the beauty of medicine here in Mexico, we waited ten minutes while the doctor helped two people ahead of us in line.

I embarrassedly told the doctor what had happened. She took a look with her little lighted scope. She closed her eyes to think. She had me lie on my side and filled my ear with oxegenated water, hoping the rubber would float to the top, closer to the exit of my ear canal. No such luck; the darned thing was wedged in there. The water did soothe the pain a bit though. And we sure did have fun laughing about it all.

Finally, she took a long hook-like tool, and turned the rubber thingy around in my ear canal to get a better grasp. She was very, very gentle, but MAN did that hurt! Darned elephant! She grabbed the ear bud cap with a long tweezer-like tool, I winced audibly, and then she stopped. She didn’t want to hurt me. She wasn’t sure what to do. I begged her to yank it out, she obliged, and oilá. I was free! The elephant was out of my ear canal!

The whole operation cost 40 pesos. It took all of 25 minutes round trip from home to the doctor and back.

God bless Mexico. One more reason I love it here. No paperwork. Not even a signature. The doctor gave me a prescription for some ear drops, as she said it was a bit swollen in there.

You bet I’ll be more careful with those ear buds from now on! Please do the same. 😉