Travelogue Spring Break 2011, Day 7, Good Friday: Zacatecas

I guess we had a busy day, because I’m having a really hard time choosing the photos to use. It felt like a very relaxed and wonderful day as we wandered around the city.

Danny was unfortunately sick with a fever and stayed behind today, sleeping nearly all day. Mara, Greg and I headed out to the Rafael Coronel (mask) museum. On the way, however, we happened by the Casa de Cultura. What a find! It’s very near our hotel, but somehow we hadn’t seen it before today.

In addition to incredible handmade stuff inside (which we bought our share of), they have TWO WEEKS of FREE art classes during Semana Santa! People can study wood or rock carving, chair caning, piñata/Judas making, huichól wax beadwork and yarn work, embroidery, weaving… you name it. It was wonderful! We had such a good time looking around and talking to people, and we signed up for classes on Monday.

From there we wandered across town to the mask museum. I am going to have to do a special “architecture of Zacatecas” blog or photo page, as there is just too much to cover here, such a wealth of beauty. On the way we passed the Templo de Santo Domingo which had been closed yesterday, so we peeked inside. They have gold altars down both side walls, plus a gorgeous main altar and organ.

The mask museum itself is housed in the former Convent of San Francisco. The building is incredible—ruins and gardens, nearly jungle-like, plus a lawn out front and very modern installations in the museum itself. So happy we went.

Rafael, like his brother Pedro, was an artist and collector. While Pedro seemed to collect paintings, Pedro collected masks. They are from all over Mexico, and it is astounding how many of them, and how wonderful, they are! They say it’s the largest collection of masks in the world.  We had such a good time looking through the collection, and we thoroughly enjoyed the site, too.

There were also quite a few musical instruments that were pretty remarkable. I do love folk art.

And they had masks that weren’t for the face, but rather to step into and dance with. They seemed a lot of fun.

Outside the main mask museum they had what may be a temporary exhibit, I’m not sure, but it was of incredibly real marionettes in various scenes.

From the museum we walked downhill around the corner to eat at a place Greg had found online: Los Dorados de Villa. Inside the place was chock-full of Mexican curio and history. Several of the walls are papered with old money/bills.

It was the cutest little house, and it had quite the “soup Nazi” at the door! She was actually wonderful, but I don’t envy her job! Very pushy people try to cut the line or pay her off to get ahead, but she held her ground. She took people to be seated in the order they arrived, or some had reservations.



The food was INCREDIBLE. The three of us had pozole, enchiladas doradas con lomo en crema de poblano, and encacahuatadas. OMG! TO DIE FOR! The encacahuatadas were a light chipotle cream sauce with peanut, very Thai, yet very Mexican. I could only eat two of the five in the bowl.

From there we headed back to the hotel to check on poor Danny, who honest to goodness had slept most of the day. On the way we were able to get into the cathedral (very modern compared to other churches in the city), and had the joy of strolling through this gorgeous city that is wall-to-wall party/festival this week. Everywhere you look is joy.

Danny was feeling better, so joined us for the Procession of Silence. That was also most incredible, held on Good Friday evening. I will devote a separate blog post to that.

About Dianne Hofner Saphiere

There are loads of talented people in this gorgeous world of ours. We all have a unique contribution to make, and if we collaborate, I am confident we have all the pieces we need to solve any problem we face. I have been an intercultural organizational effectiveness consultant since 1979, working primarily with for-profit multinational corporations. I lived and worked in Japan in the late 70s through the 80s, and currently live in and work from México, where with a wonderful partner we've raised a bicultural, global-minded son. I have worked with organizations and people from over 100 nations in my career. What's your story?

4 thoughts on “Travelogue Spring Break 2011, Day 7, Good Friday: Zacatecas

  1. I can't tell you how much fun it is to read your comments about Zacatecas. I was surprised at the mask photos you were able to take as I thought for sure photos were forbidden, or maybe that was just in some rooms. It seems you picked the perfect time to go there and I love the idea of free art classes. So much in Mexico is tuned toward the PEOPLE and not the peso/dollar; that is as it should be. I hope Danny is up to snuff now. Maybe we should go again next year during the cultural festival.Hard to repeat cities when there are so many to see in this country, but some just leave a warm fuzzy feeling more so than others '-)

  2. AS an aside, on the way home if you come through Durango, you might want to stop at Cremeria Wallender, a deli/garden restaurant equal to anything in in NYC!! It is amazing. We made a point of spending the night in Durango just so we could go and have lunch there!

  3. Yes, Zoe, everyone was taking photos in the mask museum, just without flash. Danny's much better–he enjoyed the cabalgata in Jerez immensely. Funny you talk about coming back. We've been saying the same, but coming back at a time when it's not so crowded and with so much to do! 🙂 You all in Mazatlán over Semana Santa??? Great weather I hope?

  4. Oh yes…now I remember. Photos without the flash and we couldn't figure out how to turn it off! Duh. I guess there are pros and cons about the visiting times. Very quiet when we were there, but still lots to do. I would like seeing the special cultural offerings and definitely want to try Los Dorados de Villa!! The weather has finally turned the corner to summer and is perfect….now. Just wait.'-) Crowds orderly and having fun, while we perch on our hilltop haven and don't wander too far afield.

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